Nimbus-T Will Be At The European Oncology Convention- June 6&7 2018

Nimbus-T Will Be At The European Oncology Convention- June 6&7 2018

6th & 7th June 2018 – ExCeL London – The European Oncology Convention Booth 3002

We had a great event in London and look forward to connecting with companies that expressed interest in our technology. Check out our Nimbus-T Telegram Channel:

The European Oncology Convention is Europe’s leading trade event for oncology professionals. The show has an unparalleled line-up of expert-led seminars, interactive workshops and cutting-edge exhibitors showcasing the industry’s most state-of-the-art technologies used to study and treat cancer. Visitors get the unique opportunity to not only see the latest systems and technologies shaping the future of oncology diagnosis and treatment, but can also connect with their visionary creators under one roof.Taking place at ExCeL, London on 6th & 7th June 2018, the event is completely free to attend. To book your free tickets go to: www.oncologyconvention.com or call 0117 930 4927.

Nimbus-T presents our Nimbus-Key platform that unifies the multitude of patient data across the healthcare spectrum through secure identity management and authentication empowered by blockchain.

The Nimbus-T App brings convenience for the users, better diagnostics, time and cost savings to providers, minimizes errors and prevents ID breaches.

Whereas, most IAM providers are focused on enterprise solutions, we are focused on inter-enterprise healthcare solutions that bind medical IDs with our patent pending Nimbus-Key Platform.

We are currently focused on assisting the clinical trials community with identity management, medical records aggregation, serial consents and secure prescriptions.

We are looking forward to seeing you all at this amazing event.

Contact: Info@nimbus-t.io

Cancer Immunotherapy Proves Itself in Earlier-Stage Disease

Cancer Immunotherapy Proves Itself in Earlier-Stage Disease

MADRID (Reuters) – Cancer doctors are widening the net for immunotherapy, a hot new class of drugs that enlist the body’s defenses in the fight against tumors.  The latest research shared with 23,000 experts at Europe’s top oncology meeting shows how medicines that have already delivered durable benefits in metastatic disease can also work well at an earlier stage.  The findings promise to expand the market for established immuno-oncology (I-O) drugs from companies like Merck, Bristol-Myers Squibb and Roche, while opening up a window for relative latecomers such as AstraZeneca.

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Novartis Posts a Win, Roche a Flop in Skin Cancer Trials

Novartis Posts a Win, Roche a Flop in Skin Cancer Trials

A Novartis logo is pictured on its headquarters building in Mumbai April 1, 2013. REUTERS/Vivek Prakash/File Photo

ZURICH/MADRID (Reuters) – Swiss drugmaker Novartis notched a trial win for its drug cocktail against skin cancer on Monday, while a rival treatment from Roche with slipping sales failed in a separate study with a similar patient group.  All the medicines were tested in melanoma patients who had undergone surgery to cut out tumors and had a genetic mutation called BRAF, making them likely to respond to the targeted cancer pills. Patients with BRAF mutations constitute around half of the melanoma population.  Novartis’s mix of Tafinlar and Mekinist slashed the risk of melanoma returning or death by 53 percent versus placebo in patients with stage III disease, according to data released at the European Society for Medical Oncology Congress in Madrid.  “These are the best results ever shown for an adjuvant (post-surgery) treatment in stage III melanomas,” said Axel Hauschild of the University of Kiel, Germany, one of the main researchers on the Novartis trial. “These are practice-changing results.”

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University of Utah Health, Intermountain win $3.8M NCI grant to create cancer screening tool

University of Utah Health, Intermountain win $3.8M NCI grant to create cancer screening tool

Photo mathisworks, Getty Images

The National Cancer Institute has awarded a $3.8 million grant to researchers at the University of Utah Health, Intermountain Healthcare, and the Huntsman Cancer Institute, enabling them to develop an advanced cancer screening tool.  Their creation will marry EHR technologies and clinical decision support (CDS) techniques to screen patients for breast cancer and colorectal cancer.  The tool will pinpoint those who are at high risk for these types of cancer. It will also offer individualized evidence so clinicians and patients can understand proper screening strategies.  Researchers from the Salt Lake City-based organizations will rely on assistance from oncologists, primary care physicians, and genetic counselors.

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Arizona accuses drugmaker Insys of fraudulent opioid marketing

Arizona accuses drugmaker Insys of fraudulent opioid marketing

Photo: Image from Reuters | Fentanyl Packaging

(Reuters) – Arizona sued Insys Therapeutics Inc on Thursday, accusing the drugmaker of engaging in a fraudulent marketing scheme aimed at increasing sales of a fentanyl-based cancer pain medicine called Subsys.  The lawsuit by Arizona Attorney General Mark Brnovich in Maricopa County Superior Court in Phoenix comes during a series of federal and state investigations centered on Insys’ drug Subsys amid a national opioid addiction epidemic.

The lawsuit accused Arizona-based Insys of paying doctors sham speaker fees in exchange for writing prescriptions of Subsys and of misleading insurers into believing patients who were prescribed the opioid had cancer when they actually did not.

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Will a new leukemia drug from Novartis be a quantum leap for cancer drug prices?

Will a new leukemia drug from Novartis be a quantum leap for cancer drug prices?

Photo: Devrimb, Getty Images | MedCity News

When doctors talk about a new leukemia drug from Novartis, they ooze enthusiasm, using words like “breakthrough,” “revolutionary” and “a watershed moment.”  But when they think about how much the therapy is likely to cost, their tone turns alarmist.  “It’s going to cost a fortune,” said Dr. Ivan Borrello at Johns Hopkins Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center in Baltimore.  “From what we’re hearing, this will be a quantum leap more expensive than other cancer drugs,” said Leonard Saltz, chief of gastrointestinal oncology at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York.